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English

Department Philosophy
The Seton Catholic English department teaches students to read critically while interpreting, analyzing, and writing for a variety of purposes through Pre-AP and AP courses. Through the study of literature and language, our students are challenged and encouraged to make connections to spiritual, emotional, and physical health and to lead moral lives for others. Infusing Common Core State Standards into the curriculum alongside our Catholic faith and values prepares our students to be successful at any college. Students are required to complete 4 years of English classes at Seton Catholic.
 
Course Offerings
Honors English 9/English 9 (1 credit)
This course refines the language arts skills of students entering Seton from a variety of backgrounds. It focuses on the mastery of the basic elements of the English language and specific literary types. It seeks to develop a foundation on which subsequent English courses can be built. After an initial review of paragraph skills, this course will develop an understanding of the writing process and proceed to more sophisticated types of writing. This class will use literary content to develop skills in reading, writing, speaking, research, vocabulary, organization, and critical thinking. Additional texts will be used to teach particular skills.
 
Honors English 10/English 10 (1 credit)
This course further refines the skills learned in Pre-AP English 9 / English 9. It focuses on the mastery of the English language and specific literary types. The literary focus is literature from around the world to introduce students to different perspectives and writing techniques. It seeks to further develop the foundation on which subsequent English classes are built. This course continues to put into practice the writing process and includes a unit on basic speech skills. This class will use literary content to develop skills in reading, writing, speaking, research, vocabulary, organization, and critical thinking. Additional texts will be used to teach particular skills.
 
English 11 (1 credit)
English 11 is a course that develops students’ ability to think and communicate. Through reading, discussion, and writing, students will learn to more skillfully extract ideas from literature, to develop their own responses, and to write in a clear and logical manner. The literary focus is American literature that parallels the chronology of our country’s history. A 6-10 page research-based thesis paper is required.
 
AP Language and Composition (1 credit)
Grade Level: 11
Prerequisite: Approval of present English teacher.
The AP Language and Composition course is designed to help students become skilled readers of prose from a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. The students will also become skilled writers who can compose for a variety of purposes. Through writing and reading experiences in this course, students should become aware of the interactions among writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects, as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effective writing. Emphasis is placed on collegiate level writing that includes a 15-20 page research based thesis paper.
 
English 12 (1 Credit)
This course is a survey of selected world masterpieces. Students will deepen their acceleration of literary elements and expand their awareness of the cultural themes raised by specific texts. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of analytical and writing skills transferable to other disciplines. Activities will include writing assignments, oral presentations and group discussions.
 
AP Literature and Composition (1 credit)
Grade Level: 12
Prerequisite: Approval of present English teacher.
The AP English Literature and Composition course is designed to engage students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students can deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students should consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism and tone.
Faculty
Claire Breiholz 
English Faculty 
cbreiholz@setonhigh.org
Amanda Chase
English Faculty 
achase@setonhigh.org
Julie Kuznetsov
English Faculty 
jkuznetsov@setonhigh.org